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New Zealand Travel Itinerary

7 Days In New Zealand

DAY

PLACE TO VISIT

OPENING HOURS

ADDRESS

Day 1 01:30 AM Travel time (10h 55m duration) Traveling from Hong Kong to Auckland Landed in Auckland Airport(AKL)
Day 1 04:30 PM Sky Tower Hours:
Mon to Sun (09:00 AM to 09:30 PM)
Address: Victoria St W, Auckland, 1010, New Zealand
Day 2 Auckland War Memorial Museum
It is one of New Zealand's most important museums and war memorials. Its collections concentrate on New Zealand history, natural history, and military history.
Hours:
Mon to Sun (10:00 AM to 5:00 PM)
Address: The Auckland Domain, Parnell, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
Day 2 SEA LIFE Kelly Tarlton's Aquarium
Kelly Tarlton's Sea Life Aquarium is a public aquarium in Auckland, New Zealand that was opened in 1985. Located at 23 Tamaki Drive, it was the brainchild of New Zealand marine archaeologist and diver Kelly Tarlton.
Hours:
Mon to Sun (10:00 AM to 5:00 PM)
Address: 23 Tamaki Dr, Orakei, Auckland 1071, New Zealand
Day 3 Auckland Zoo Hours:
Mon to Sun (09:00 AM to 09:30 PM)
Address: Motions Rd, Auckland 1022, New Zealand
Day 3 Auckland Domain
The Auckland Domain is Auckland's oldest park.
Hours:
Mon to Sun (Opens 24hrs)
Address: Park Rd, Grafton, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
Day 3 Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki
Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki is the principal public gallery in Auckland, New Zealand, and has the most extensive collection of national and international art in New Zealand.
Hours:
Mon to Sun (10:00 AM to 5:00 PM)
Address: Wellesley St E, Auckland, 1010, New Zealand.
Day 4 Rainbow's End
Rainbow's End is a 9.3 hectares theme park in Manukau, Auckland. Rainbow's End includes the main theme park and also Kidz Kingdom.
Hours:
Mon to Fri(10:00 AM–5:00PM)
Address: 2 Clist Cres, Manukau, Auckland 2104, New Zealand.
Day 4 SKYCITY Auckland
It is a casino and event centre in the central business district of Auckland, New Zealand, between Victoria and Federal Streets. Located at the base of the Sky Tower.
Hours:
Mon to Sun (Open 24hrs)
Address: Victoria Street &, Federal St, Auckland, 1010, New Zealand.
Day 4 Visitors walk around an open ledge on Auckland Sky Tower at this unique adventure destination. Hours:
Mon to Sun (10:00 AM to 5:00 PM)
Address: 72 Victoria St W, Auckland, 1141, New Zealand.
Day 5 Auckland Botanic Gardens
Auckland Botanic Gardens is a 64-hectare botanical garden in Manurewa, South Auckland, New Zealand, owned by Auckland Council.
Hours:
Mon to Fri (8:00 AM–6:00 PM)
Address: 102 Hill Rd, The Gardens, Auckland 2105, New Zealand.
Day 5 at New Zealand Maritime Museum
The New Zealand Maritime Museum Hui Te Ananui A Tangaroa is a maritime museum in Auckland, New Zealand. It is located on Hobson Wharf, adjacent to the Viaduct Harbour in central Auckland.
Hours:
Mon to sun (10:00 AM to 5:00 PM)
Address:1Corner of Quay and, Hobson St, Viaduct Harbour, Auckland 1140, New Zealand
Day 5 Kitekite Falls
Kitekite Falls is a scenic 3-tiered waterfall near Auckland, New Zealand. The falls drop a total of 40 metres.
Hours:
Mon to Sun (Opens 24hrs)
Address: Piha 0772, New Zealand.
Day 6 Sydney Harbour Bridge
It is a heritage-listed steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district and the North Shore.
Hours:
Mon to Sun (Opens 24hrs)
Address: Sydney Harbour Bridge, Sydney NSW, Australia
Day 6 Mount Victoria
Takarunga / Mount Victoria is the highest volcano on Auckland's North Shore, rising to 87 m. Its age is currently unknown.
Hours:
Mon to Sun (Opens 24hrs)
Address: orth Island, New Zealand.
Day 7 Museum of Transport and Technology
The Museum of Transport and Technology is a science and technology museum located in Western Springs, Auckland, New Zealand.
Hours:
Mon to sun 10:00 AM to 5:30 PM
Address: 805 Great North Rd, Western Springs, Auckland 1022, New Zealand.
Day 7 Albert Park
Albert Park is a public park in central Auckland, bounded by Wellesley Street East, Princes Street, Bowen Avenue and Kitchener Street.
Hours: Mon to Sun (Opens 24hrs)
Address: 33-43 Princes St, Auckland, 1010, New Zealand

Sky Tower

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The Sky Tower is a telecommunications and observation tower in Auckland, New Zealand. Located at the corner of Victoria and Federal Streets within the city's CBD.

Auckland War Memorial Museum

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Kelly Tarlton's Sea Life Aquarium is a public aquarium in Auckland, New Zealand that was opened in 1985. Located at 23 Tamaki Drive, it was the brainchild of New Zealand marine archaeologist and diver Kelly Tarlton.

SEA LIFE Kelly Tarlton's Aquarium

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Kelly Tarlton's Sea Life Aquarium is a public aquarium in Auckland, New Zealand that was opened in 1985. Located at 23 Tamaki Drive, it was the brainchild of New Zealand marine archaeologist and diver Kelly Tarlton.

img credit: https://www.experienceoz.com.au

Auckland Zoo

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Auckland Zoo is a 16.35-hectare zoological garden in Auckland, New Zealand, situated next to Western Springs park not far from Auckland's central business district. It is run by the Auckland Council with the Zoological Society of Auckland as a supporting organisation.

img credit:https://www.languages.ac.nz/kiwi-auckland-zoo/

Auckland Domain

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The Auckland Domain is Auckland's oldest park, and at 75 hectares one of the largest in the city. Located in the central suburb of Grafton, the park contains all of the explosion crater and most of the surrounding tuff ring of the Pukekawa volcano.

img credit: https://www.wikiwand.com

Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki

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Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki is the principal public gallery in Auckland, New Zealand, and has the most extensive collection of national and international art in New Zealand. It frequently hosts travelling international exhibitions.

img credit: Aucklandnz.com

Rainbow's End

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Rainbow's End is a 9.3 hectares theme park in Manukau, Auckland. Rainbow's End includes the main theme park and also Kidz Kingdom, a family entertainment center for children 8 years and under. The park, owned by Rangatira Limited, is currently New Zealand's largest theme park and currently employs up to 300 staff.

img credit:iguide2u.com

SKYCITY Auckland

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SkyCity Auckland is a casino and event centre in the central business district of Auckland, New Zealand, between Victoria and Federal Streets. Located at the base of the Sky Tower, it was the second casino in New Zealand, and is still the only one in Auckland.

img credit:iguide2u.com

Auckland Botanic Gardens

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Auckland Botanic Gardens is a 64-hectare botanical garden in Manurewa, South Auckland, New Zealand, owned by Auckland Council. The first purchase of land by the Auckland Regional Authority – predecessor of Auckland Regional Council – dates back to 1968. Developments started in 1973.

img credit: playschoolaupairs.co.nz

New Zealand Maritime Museum

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The New Zealand Maritime Museum Hui Te Ananui A Tangaroa is a maritime museum in Auckland, New Zealand. It is located on Hobson Wharf, adjacent to the Viaduct Harbour in central Auckland.

img credit:https://jontynz.com

Kitekite Falls

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Kitekite Falls is a scenic 3-tiered waterfall near Auckland, New Zealand. The falls drop a total of 40 metres.

img credit:https://jontynz.com

Mount Victoria

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akarunga / Mount Victoria is the highest volcano on Auckland's North Shore, rising to 87 m. Its age is currently unknown. Its lava flows now line much of Devonport's waterfront. An important pa once occupied its slopes, and some of the pa's earthworks can still be seen.

img credit:https://jontynz.com

Museum of Transport and Technology

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The Museum of Transport and Technology is a science and technology museum located in Western Springs, Auckland, New Zealand. It is located close to the Western Springs Stadium, Auckland Zoo and the Western Springs Park.

img credit:https://www.havehalalwilltravel.com

Albert Park

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Albert Park is a public park in central Auckland, bounded by Wellesley Street East, Princes Street, Bowen Avenue and Kitchener Street.

img credit:https://jontynz.com

Cost of living in NewZealand

Travel Itinerary provides an introductory guidance on cost of living in NewZealand. In general, prices for basic necessities such as food, clothing, public transport, basic education and utilities in NewZealand are quite moderate. Public transport and taxis are very affordable as well.On the other hand, housing, private schooling and maintaining an automobile can be costly. If you are an expatriate whose compensation package includes benefits such as transportation or car allowances, housing, childcare, payment of school fees, entertainment allowances and other work-related benefits, these costs would be less of a concern to you and you will find that life in NewZealand can be quite expensive. Even if you do not have an extensive package, you can always find something that fits your budget; for every category, NewZealand offers a wide range of available choices and prices.The majority of expats will head to New Zealand’s main cities of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch, with Auckland being significantly more expensive.

Is New Zealand more expensive than Australia?
In terms of flights, again Australia happens to be more expensive. ... As you can see, Australia is generally more expensive than New Zealand, but there is a positive flip-side to the prices. While Australia is more expensive, it also has a larger tourism infrastructure than New Zealand.

Cost of Accommodation

The cost of housing in NewZealand depends on factors such as the property’s proximity to the city, relative age of the property, availability of recreational facilities (such as pool, gym, etc.) and the quality of furnishings that come with the accommodation. You should take your time to decide where you want to live in NewZealand and make a decision only after careful consideration of the average rental cost as well as your personal preferences.


Accommodation is the highest spending one international student has to deal with while studying in NewZealand. There are countless apartments to rent in NewZealand, but since every single cent matters for you as a student, you need to choose wisely and carefully. The cost of accommodation in NewZealand changes from place to place. Moreover, in big cities, you may encounter a huge contrast in terms of rent prices from an area to another within the same city. That in mind, it is very important you spend enough time searching for apartments which match your financial capacities. As you’d expect, it is almost a rule of thumb that urban areas have higher rent prices than apartments located in peripheral areas. In addition to location, size and furnishing will also account for a higher cost. Surely a big apartment with expensive furnishes will have a higher rent price.

Cost of Food

How much does an average meal cost in New Zealand? The prices at normal restaurants vary tremendously, but you can expect to pay anywhere between $8 and $15 for breakfast and between $20 and $40 for dinner per person. The cost of lunch sits somewhere between the cost of breakfast and dinner but may cost as much as dinner if you tend to have big lunches.

Transportation Costs

It consists of buses, trains, and ferries. The Auckland public transport system is New Zealand's largest by total passenger volume, although not by trips per capita. Buses are the most widely used form of public transport in Auckland. ... Auckland also has a commuter rail system, one of two in the country.

Does New Zealand have good public transportation? Bus. Buses are the cheapest and most common form of public transport available for travelling between towns and cities. ... Although not public transport, hop-on hop-off buses are also a popular way to get around New Zealand, especially among backpackers.

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What is the typical weather in New Zealand?

The north of New Zealand is subtropical and the south temperate. The warmest months are December, January and February, and the coldest June, July and August. In summer, the average maximum temperature ranges between 20 - 30ºC and in winter between 10 - 15ºC.


What are the average monthly temperatures in New Zealand?

Annual mean temperature. Mean annual temperatures range from 10 °C (50 °F) in the south to 16 °C (61 °F) in the north. The coldest month is usually July and the warmest month is usually January or February.

What is the climate like in New Zealand?

New Zealand has a largely temperate climate. While the far north has subtropical weather during summer, and inland alpine areas of the South Island can be as cold as -10 C in winter, most of the country lies close to the coast, which means mild temperatures, moderate rainfall, and abundant sunshine.

What is the warmest city in New Zealand?

Auckland warmest city in New Zealand. Say what you like about our nation's largest city - Auckland is officially the warmest area of New Zealand.

What is the coldest month in New Zealand?

The coldest month is usually July and the warmest month is usually January or February. In New Zealand generally there are relatively small variations between summer and winter temperatures, although inland and to the east of the ranges the variation is greater (up to 14°C).

Does New Zealand snow?

Snow typically appears during the months of June through October, though cold snaps can occur outside these months. Most snow in New Zealand falls in the mountainous areas, like the Central Plateau in the north, and the Southern Alps in the south. It also falls heavily in inland Canterbury and Otago.

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English is the predominant language and a de facto official language of New Zealand. Almost the entire population speaks it either as native speakers or proficiently as a second language. The New Zealand English dialect is most similar to Australian English in pronunciation, with some key differences. The Māori language of the indigenous Māori people was made the first de jure official language in 1987. New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) has been an official language since 2006. Many other languages are used by New Zealand's minority ethnic communities.


English language


English is spoken by 95.4 percent of the population. It has long been the predominant language and the de facto official language. It is the primary language used in parliament, the government, the courts, and the education system. Its official status has been presumed and is not codified in statute. In 2018, New Zealand First MP Clayton Mitchell introduced a bill to parliament to statutorily recognize English as an official language. New Zealand English is mostly non-rhotic with the exception of the "southern burr" found principally in Southland and parts of Otago. It is similar to Australian English and many speakers from the Northern Hemisphere are unable to tell the two accents apart. In New Zealand English the short ⟨i⟩ (as in kit) has become centralized, leading to the shibboleth fish and chips sounding like "fush and chups" to the Australian ear. The words rarely and really, reel and real, doll and dole, pull and pool witch and which, and full and fill can sometimes be pronounced as homophones. New Zealand English exhibits the near–square merger, so hair, hare, hear, and here are homophones. Some New Zealanders pronounce the past participles grown, thrown, and mown using two syllables, whereas groan, throne, and moan are pronounced as one syllable. New Zealanders often reply to a question or emphasize a point by adding a rising intonation at the end of the sentence. New Zealand English has also borrowed words and phrases from Māori, such as haka (war dance), kia ora (a greeting), mana (power or prestige), puku (stomach), taonga (treasure), and waka (canoe)

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Māori language


The Māori language of the indigenous Māori people has been an official language by statute since 1987, with rights and obligations to use it defined by the Maori Language Act 1987. It can, for example, be used in legal settings, such as in court, but proceedings are recorded in English only unless private arrangements are made and agreed upon by the judge.
An Eastern Polynesian language, Māori is closely related to Tahitian and Cook Islands Māori. After the Second World War, Māori was discouraged from speaking their language in schools and workplaces and it existed as a community language only in a few remote areas. As a consequence of this, many Māori came to view te Reo Māori as a language without purpose and chose not to teach their children. Since the 1970s, the language has undergone a process of revitalization and is spoken by a larger number of people. Of the 185,955 people (4.0 percent of respondents) who claimed they could hold a conversation in Māori in the 2018 census, 86.2 percent identified as Māori, but, conversely, only 18.4 percent of Māori-identifying spoke te Reo Māori. No adult Māori alive in New Zealand today does not also speak English.



New Zealand Sign Language


New Zealand Sign Language, the main language of the deaf community in New Zealand, has been an official language by statute since 2006, by virtue of the New Zealand Sign Language Act 2006. It is legal to use it and have access to it in legal proceedings and government services. In the 2018 census, 22,986 people (0.5%) reported the ability to use New Zealand Sign Language.


Immigrant languages


New Zealand has immigrants from European, Asian, and Pacific Island countries who have brought their languages with them. According to Ethnologue (as of 2017), the largest groups are Samoan (86,400), Hindi (66,300), Mandarin Chinese (52,300), French (49,100), and Yue Chinese (44,600). These minority foreign languages are concentrated in the main cities, particularly Auckland where recent immigrant groups have settled. In the 2018 census, 115,830 respondents who spoke at least one language did not include English as one of their spoken languages. The number and proportion of multilingual (people who can speak two or more languages) have continued to increase since the 2001 census. In the 2018 census, the number of multilingual people was 946,275, or 20.6 percent of respondents who spoke at least one language. The highest proportions of multilingual speakers lived in Auckland (30.9%) and Wellington (21.2%) regions.